Critical Perspectives and Academic Arguments

When writing an essay, it is necessary for us to construct an argument. There are correct and incorrect ways to construct these arguments however, and here is where I am going to record how to construct one of these academic arguments.


What is a Critical Perspective, and an Academic agument?

A critical perspective looks at a work in a completely non-biased way. It is a method of writing where arguments are backed up with evidence and quotes, not opinions. A critical perspective is the first stage to constructing an academic argument, which is an argument where the writer weighs up other peoples opinions on a piece of work by gathering the evidence that they used to make their opinions, and using quotes and other evidence to back up their argument, as well as doing the same for different and opposing views.

Most of an academic argument written in a critical perspective will be taken up by the presentation of opinions on a work, and the evidence to support and refute them. The writers opinion only comes into play when all of the relevant facts have been presented, and the writer begins to weigh up all of this information and present what they believe the work means, with their evidence for why.


Why is this important?

The reason that writing an academic argument using a critical perspective is that it allows the writer to detach themselves from the opinions that they are presenting and their own opinions, which means that they are able to produce a balanced argument, not coloured one way or another, which would degrade the validity of the argument.


References:

Essay Info (2015) Critical Essay [Online] Available From: http://essayinfo.com/essays/critical_essay.php [Accessed: 11th February 2016]

Licester University (2016) What is Critical Writing [Online] Available From: http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/ld/resources/writing/writing-resources/critical-writing [Accesssed: 11th February 2016]

The University of North Carolina and Chapel Hill (2014) Argument [Online] Available From: http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/argument/ [Accessed: 11th February 2016]

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s